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Herbs and leaffy green vegetables in Vietnamese Cuisine September 15, 2007

Posted by adrien in Food facts, Fruits & Vegetables, Ingredients, Vietnamese Cuisine.
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Although I love both Thai and Vietnamese food, I however think that the latter is lighter and more refreshing than the former, using crisp, uncooked vegetables, subtle seasonings, unique flavor combination and a lot of raw herbs. It is textural, with fresh and sharp taste.

Actually, the pervasive use of fresh leaves and herbs sets Vietnamese Cuisine apart from other and seems unique in its kind. While Vietnamese restaurants in other regions of the world rarely manage to offer more than one kind of mint, basil or cilantro, there is in Vietnam a remarkable variety of herbs, used in many ways: wrapped around cooked meat as a guava leaf does in nem chua; chopped, as dill in Cha ca (fish cake) or fingermint does in numerous salads; stirred into the steaming noodle soup as do Thai basil and saw leaf cilantro in Pho; BBQ wrap as betel leaf in Bo la lop; main ingredients in soup or sautee’d as morning glory, spinach, yute leave; as wrappers with lettuce and rice papers; and in drinks as rau ma

Certainly the use of these fresh herbs and leaves is part of the appeal of Vietnamese food, providing fresh flavors, beautiful aromas and many interesting textural variations.

My wife’s conclusion is: “now I understand how Vietnamese women are sveltes without diet or worrying about what they eat.”

I will write a post for each herbs that we grow and use at Bai Sri.

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